Viva! Pomona, Tijuana Panthers

Switch Presents:

Viva! Pomona

Tijuana Panthers

La Sera, Grass Widow, The Urinals, The Babies, So Many Wizards, The Lovely Bad Things, together Pangea, Cosmonauts, They As In Them, Body Parts, Black Elephant, Old Man Jenkins, Business Cats, The Ugly Kids, Adapt, Suede Parade

Sat, July 14, 2012

5:00 pm

The Glass House

Pomona, CA

$12.00 - $14.00

This show is taking place at The Glass House and at Aladdin Jr 2.

Viva! Pomona
Viva! Pomona
Tijuana Panthers
Tijuana Panthers
La Sera
La Sera
Since joining all-female punk trio Vivian Girls during the spring of 2007 Katy Goodman's DIY-style bass playing and drifty-faded vocals have sent waves of adoration rippling throughout Brooklyn's pop punk circuit. Her newest band La Sera showcases her signature style, bringing her talent for creating dreamy pop songs even more to the forefront. La Sera just finished a west coast tour and had a smashing time at CMJ.
After touring the world with Vivian Girls, releasing a handful of well-received records, and starting record label Wild World with her band mates, Goodman started exploring other outlets. She played in the short-lived dream-pop band All Saints Day in the spring of 2010, and a self-titled limited-edition 7" of spectral tunes was released on indie label Art Fag earlier this year.
In February 2010 Goodman started working on some fresh material that inspired the formation of her brand new band, La Sera. Her inspiration sprung from an attraction to early pop hits from the 1950's and ethereal choral vocals. Her new songs contain warm celestial-pop melodies that echo with the dreamlike effect of a church choir and effuse a softer, less aggressive sound than the Vivian Girls.
Recording with a tambourine, guitar, and layers upon layers of heavenly vocals, she started sending her songs to filmmaker/music producer Brady Hall (the director of Vivian Girls videos "Moped Girls" and "When I'm Gone"), who immediately wanted to collaborate and dove into re-recording her rough material himself. After hearing his finished work, Katy flew to Seattle and the two recorded all the vocals, mixed the songs and filmed two La Sera music videos at Brady's home studio.
The eponymous La Sera is the result of these sessions. With a dozen fresh tracks, La Sera muses on death, love, and love lost within the span of two minute choiral pop blisters. The phantasmic quality of Goodman's voice takes hold of the contradictorily upbeat "You're Going to Cry," while "Dove Into Love" seems to send time into drifting slow motion, enveloped by a wave of guitar strums. The lilting and delicate "Hold," meanwhile, tells the story of two people hugging each other to death. Hardly Art will release the full-length in early 2011, preceded by the limited 7" for "Never Come Around" out today.
La Sera is: Katy Goodman (bass, vox), Jenn Prince (guitar, vox) and Jonathan Weinberg (drums, vox, keys).
Grass Widow
Grass Widow
From the beginning, the members of Grass Widow have maintained an objective of playing financially accessible, age-inclusive and gender-inclusive shows. As the band has continued to grow and share their post-punk influenced, intricately woven songs to larger communities through their latest release with Kill Rock Stars, their aim has been to challenge old paradigms of the music industry and confront the tired methods of categorizing music by paving a new path. "We believe in the value of music itself and promote a community in which musicians are treated with respect regardless of their pitchfork rating, their label or representation. The value assigned to a band by these forces is a manufactured concept supported by a music industry that thrives on advertising, objectification and reducing bands to "trends" and "fads" via the Internet. We want to bring the sense of integrity and accountability that is fostered in the D.I.Y. community we come from to this arena and inspire others to do the same."

Bassist/vocalist, Hannah Lew, drummer/vocalist, Lillian Maring and guitarist/vocalist, Raven Mahon chose the name Grass Widow for their San Francisco-based three-piece as a way to represent the approach they take to writing music. The phrase is rooted in 17th century literature; commonly referring to a woman whose husband is away at sea, but the visual associations of each word also provides an opportunity to interpret meaning on multiple levels. "For me," says Maring, "it's about a state of solitude when you realize parts of you may be missing." Lew adds: "The name Grass Widow refers to elements of the unknown or the subconscious, things not in plain sight."

Grass Widow approaches lyrical content in much the same way, using metaphor to express complicated, intimate themes. Inspired by the personal, they use myth and allegory to synthesize ideas and create new landscapes wherein listeners can draw their own meaning.

"We write lyrics about very personal and often dark subjects, but present the ideas in a way that disguises the content within metaphor and upbeat instrumentation," says Mahon. "Although we chose the name early on, it has evolved with us as our process has become refined."

Grass Widow formed in 2007 and quickly received attention within the Bay Area as well as national underground press via publications like Yeti. Influenced by similarly all-female punk and post-punk acts like The Neo Boys and Kleenex, they also note Roy Wood's The Move and The Kinks as a major source of inspiration, which can be heard in their three-part harmonies, complex arrangements and odd chord progressions.

In addition to these musical influences, Grass Widow is inspired by a legacy of women who have paved the way through their music and politics. Their collaborative songwriting process, the fact that they don't have a front person and that they all equally contribute to the work of the band speaks to this philosophy. In addition, they take the opportunity as an all female band to bring attention to the roles of spectacle and spectator in their scene and make a conscious effort to play shows where women are involved.
The Urinals
The Urinals
The URINALS formed in 1978 as a five-piece parody of punk rock, at UCLA’s Dykstra Hall dormitory. The band consisted of Delia Frankel (vocals), Steve Willard (guitar), Kevin Barrett (toy drums), Kjehl Johansen (toy organ) and John Jones (later Talley-Jones, bass). Their sole performance as a five-piece was a four-song set (two originals and covers of the JAM’s "This is the Modern World" and the Jetsons theme song) played at the dorm talent show, which was held in the building’s cafeteria. The acclaim was immediate and, as a bonus, the jazz band which followed them was thoroughly outraged.

The usual "creative differences" surfaced early with Frankel and Willard’s decision to depart. The remaining trio soldiered on, with Johansen picking up the guitar in place of the wheezing Emenee organ. None of the three could play their instruments, which was considered an advantage, as it forced the band to rely upon material of a tightly focused scope. Few of the early songs ventured beyond two chords.

Their debut as a trio came on Halloween eve 1978 during a dorm-wide party. Vitus Matare, keyboard-player for LA power-punk band THE LAST, stumbled upon the band and proposed to record them. Utilizing the infamous Dokorder 4-track and a microphone designed for underwater use, four songs were recorded for release on the band’s DIY label, Happy Squid Records. The peculiar ambience of the record can be traced to the technological limitations of its recording, Kevin’s clicky-sounding toy-drum kit, and the guitar & bass being played live through the same amplifier.

As the Masque bands began to make inroads into the Hollywood nightclub scene, the URINALS worked the UCLA circuit: Dykstra Hall and Kerckhoff Coffee House. The second release, "Another EP" was recorded in a film-scoring stage at the Motion Picture/Television department on campus. Although this was a three-track recording, the superior technology available yielded a more focused sound this time around.
The Babies
The Babies
In the winter of early 2008, Kevin Morby moved into Cassie Ramoneʼs small apartment in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, for a few months. Kevin, who plays bass in Woods, and Cassie, who sings and plays guitar in Vivian Girls, wanted to start a band. They both missed the sweaty loft shows they used to play before their bands moved on to larger venues and longer tours. So they wrote some songs on acoustic guitars and casually talked about playing some house parties.

The next winter, when both Woods and Vivian Girls had a longer-than-usual break from touring, they came back to their idea. Justin Sullivan, who had played with Cassie in Bossy, began practicing with them on drums, and the Babies debuted in March 2009 as a three-piece at Dead Herring, their friendsʼ loft in Brooklyn. They played a few times before asking Nathanael Stark, formerly of Bent Outta Shape, to join on bass, and the full lineupʼs first shows were that summer.

The Babies recorded and played shows in fits and spurts, whenever they all happened to be in town for a week. They recorded their self-titled debut album with Jarvis Taveniere at Rear House Studios, which doubles as Kevinʼs home; his vocals were done in his own bedroom. (Jarvis, Kevinʼs bandmate in Woods, has also recorded Real Estate, Vivian Girls, and Woods.) The debut album follows 7″ singles on Make a Mess Records & Wild World.

The Babies' songs are roughed up jewels that come from the same cloth as Hazlewood/Sinatra, VU/Nico, Pisces/Linda Bruner & other dream marriages. The band will tour the West Coast again in January, where theyʼre temporarily relocating for the winter to write their second record, before going to Europe in the spring of 2011.
So Many Wizards
So Many Wizards
null
The Lovely Bad Things
Brought together by time and fate—they’d all known each other since high school, but finally made a band together in 2009—and named by some kind of esoteric computer filename error too complex to further explain, Orange County’s The Lovely Bad Things are the hyperactive omnitalented and relentlessly hilarious garage-pop band who crowdfunded their way to an encore performance at the world-famous Primavera Sound festival and whose new album The Late Great Whatever was titled during a dream at the suggestion of their spirit guide, who happens to look strangely like Dinosaur Jr drummer Murph. Was that a lot to take in all at once? Then now you can sympathize with the cop who pulled them over on their way to the UFO museum in Roswell, New Mexico: “‘Who here has ADD?’” Brayden Ward remembers him asking. “And we all raised our hands.”

The Lovely Bad Things are Brayden and brother Camron Ward, Tim Hatch and Lauren Curtius, each a multi-instrumentalist and each devoted to a bottomless knowledge of ridiculous pop culture and comprehensive appreciation for the Pixies, though if you dismantled their songs and their record collections both you’d find Sonic Youth, Modest Mouse, the B-52s, the Wipers and of course Redd Kross, whose sense of humor and sense for a hook the Bad Things have inherited. They mostly come from the city of La Mirada, but their true home is the Lovely Bad Pad, a converted suburban garage—converted personally by the band members—that’s hosted truly legendary backyard punk shows, up to and including a surprise set by Peter, Bjorn and John, who know a good thing when they hear it.

It’s this combination of D.I.Y. spirit and off-the-wall luck that carried The Lovely Bad Things from that backyard to a cassette release on trendsetter label Burger Records that would be called one of the best L.A. punk releases of 2011 by the L.A. Weekly. And from there they ricocheted into a surprise slot at Primavera Sound festival, crowdfunding and benefit-showing just barely enough for airfare to get there and winning over their audience forever once they did. Now, after building a fan base show by show and person by frothing-at-the-mouth person—a guy once came all the way from Belgium to see them play one special song—The Lovely Bad Things have finished The Late Great Whatever for Volcom Entertainment.

The Late Great Whatever was started just after the release of the maxi-EP New Ghost/Old Waves, until now the Lovely Bad Things’ signature release. Although they’d released a full-length called Shark Week in 2010, the album that would become …Whatever was going to be something new, they explain: “Our first real full-length,” says Tim. At least half of Shark Week’s songs were written in … oh, about two minutes, calculates Lauren, because back then Lovely Bad Things were just discovering the knockout sugar high that came from just playing music with each other. But this would be different: “How do I say it and not sound like a super-cliché musician?” asks Camron. “More mature, I guess?”

So what’s that mean? Not one but two Star Wars references on the tracklist, Bigfoot on the cover, a shout-out to Macho Man Randy Savage and a relentless collection of the strongest songs The Lovely Bad Things have ever done. What, did you think “mature” meant? They were going to get all mopey and slow? (“Just say it’s ‘globular’ and ‘shapeshifting,’” suggests Camron.) Produced by Jon Gilbert in the studio built and run by Crystal Antlers’ frontman Jonny Bell, this is a record by a band who’ve developed a telepathic language of their own, with songs that stop and start and turn inside out in ways you just can’t play unless you know exactly what everyone else in the studio with you is thinking.

On The Late Great Whatever, Lovely Bad Things roll out just about anything you’d want about 15% faster than you’d expect. Do they do it all? They indeed do it all. They have stormers like “Kessel Run” and the stand-out “Randall the Savage,” which is all jittery post-punky guitar and gradually building insanity. Then they have sweetheart pop-punk like “Maybe I Know,” which is born for the best mixtapes of 2013. They have surf’s-up guitar (“Styx And Branches”) and wah-wah guitar (“Oozin It”) and oh-my-God-I’m-being-attacked-by-furious-bees guitar (“Kessel Run”). They have Frank Black-style spoken-word stammer (“Fried Eyes”) and cooled-out Kim Deal back-ups. And those heartbreaker harmonies that are part of what make The Lovely Bad Things so special? Pretty much everywhere, thanks to Lauren’s gift for melody, but why don’t you go right to “Rope Swing” if you need ‘em right away? And if this still seems like a lot to take in at once, don’t worry—down some (or too much) caffeine, roll down the windows and let The Late Great Whatever take the wheel. Just watch out for the cops on the way to the UFO museum. When they hear music like this, they pay way too much attention.
together Pangea
together Pangea
"Pangea, the super continent, might just have something in common with the super garage rockers of the same moniker hailing out of Los Angeles—and I'm talking about the word super here. These dudes back big names, they tour with the best of the garage punk world and for the simple reason that they belong there—but we want, nay need, more Pangea.Killer Dreams, their split released EP from Lauren and Ghostbot Records, follows the stellarLiving Dummy and proves that they are living up to that super-ism that invisibly trails their name." - Get Bent

The LA garage-punk quartet Pangea creates the sort of sloppy and squalling rock tunes that fans of Wavves or Ty Segall would appreciate. How do they stand out among their contemporaries? The froggy-throated lead singer and his crass lyrics are incongruously mashed on top of nimble surf-rock guitar lyrics and harmonizing, doo-wopping backup vocals, resulting in something strangely and delightfully charming, kind of like the way you might find a snotty neighborhood troublemaker to be a little cute. There's a great video on Vimeo of Pangea at the Silverlake comic book store Secret Headquarters playing "Night of the Living Dummy" on their duct-taped, PBR-stickered guitars; the song is from last fall's Living Dummy, which was released on tape and vinyl on California cassette kings Burger Records and includes such masculinely-awkward tracks as "Make Me Feel Weird" and "Too Drunk To Come." - Seattle Weekly

"Living Dummy is something more punk records should be: funny. Songs like "Too Drunk To Cum" are hilariously out of control, clutching at the outer rims of sanity. (The group even deadpans an eerie laugh on the track.) But the real star here is the music--you get the feeling that the band -- especially the drummer -- is beating the shit out of their instruments. It's loud and crude, and that's a good thing." - LA WEEKLY

Facebook comments:

Venue Information:
The Glass House
200 W. Second St
Pomona, CA, 91766
http://www.theglasshouse.us/