Aye Nako

Aye Nako

Upset, The Groans

Tue, May 9, 2017

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Acerogami

Pomona, CA

$10.00

This event is 21 and over

Aye Nako
Aye Nako
Silver Haze is the second full-length by Brooklyn's Aye Nako. The album features 12 songs recorded last year at Room 17 in Brooklyn with Joe Rogers and will be released via Don Giovanni Records on April 7.

Formed in 2010, Aye Nako is a queer punk band comprised of four weirdos that write disorienting, but highly melodic punk songs while carving out a space to co-exist in the fold between art, music, and politics. They’re a punk band, but not necessarily of the power-chord-playing variety. The songs on Silver Haze are dense and detailed, formed from a private language of interlocking melodies and rhythms.

It’s music that makes use of blunt force, but also finds room for deep detail. Songs hinge on the call and response between Mars Dixon and Jade Payne, who split vocal and guitar duties. These are complex compositions that document various levels of heartbreak -- about trauma, abuse, and discrimination. And while there’s a spirit of confrontation, there’s also a deeply felt tenderness. Distortion and grit regularly pivot into moments of woozy bliss. The personal past is frequently exhumed and examined. Silver Haze opens with “We’re Different Now” places a tape collage of Dixon and their childhood friend’s playtime over a rhythm track, documenting a frozen moment of innocence. Closer “Maybe She’s Bored With It” is a journalistic snapshot of the singer’s first day-job working the early morning shift at an Arkansas make-up factory.

Originally formed to subdue personal boredom, but now operating on another frequency, Aye Nako are actively seeking a planet where those who fall in the margins can feel okay about being themselves. The band has self-released one full length, Unleash Yourself (2013), and also put out an EP, The Blackest Eye (2015) through Don Giovanni Records. They have toured throughout the US with Screaming Females, Joanna Gruesome, and Speedy Ortiz.
Upset
Upset
For the past few years, Ali Koehler has been best known as the drummer of the pop group Best Coast and the noisy girl punk trio Vivian Girls. After her departure from Best Coast, Koehler decided to step up from behind the kit to front a band of her own, embracing her melodic punk-spirited songwriting impulses with Upset. Joined by Patty Schemel (of Hole) on drums and Jennifer Prince on lead guitar and vocals, Upsetwill release its massively hooky debut record, She's Gone, this fall.

With 12 songs in just under 30 minutes, it's a pop-punk album that immediately sounds classic, full of unshakeable hooks and the sincerest of shouts. It is fitting that She's Gone will see a release with Don Giovanni Records; the record could easily fit in the record collections of Ergs or Lemuria fans. She's Gone was recorded primarily at Koehler's house in April of 2013 by Kyle Gilbride of Swearin'.

As a songwriter, Koehler draws on the snarky angst and punk simplicity of her previous bands, with a delivery that masks angry and cheeky lyrics with a sweet-sung and wide-eyed infliction. She's Gone opens with "Back To School," conveying that sense of first-day anxieties and uncertainty that comes with a return to an old routine. "First day back's a heart attack," Koehler sings. It's an intro to the sort of personal and relatable lyrics she sings throughout, full of anxious introspection. "Game Over" (written and sung by Jenn Prince) is bored and angsty, channeling distant vox and 90s-indebted noise-pop guitars; "Never Wanna" is an urgent and impatient earworm. "I just don't know what to do / I can't stop thinking of you," Koehler sings.

"Queen Frosteen" uses childlike, upbeat rhymes and a sticky chorus to set up her indictment of a friendship gone wrong. "When she sets the scene / it's a sugarcoated fantasy," she sings, in a way that's so overly sugar-sweet, it almost sounds sarcastic. "Queen Frosteen, my enemy / she's everything and I'm nobody / Queen Frosteen, my enemy." The closing track sounds similarly burned and pissed about it. "This was a lesson learned / this is goodbye," the band sings, girl-gang style. "That's not what friends are for."

She's Gone has moments of self-doubt and resonant angst ("I can't remember feeling worse than this," Koehler sings on "Oxfords and Wingtips") but it has a sense of humor about it as well; "About Me" even starts with a giggle. It's a sort of record that's not afraid to have sincere open-book, downer moments, but doesn't take itself too seriously.
The Groans
The Groans
Queer Punk, Puppy Punk, Punk

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Venue Information:
Acerogami
228 W 2nd St
Pomona, CA, 91766