Adolescents, Mudhoney

Adolescents

Mudhoney

Claw Hammer

Sat, March 9, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Glass House

Pomona, CA

$23.00

This event is all ages

Adolescents
Adolescents
The Adolescents are a punk rock band from Fullerton, CA, USA. The band has broken-up and reunited a number of times and have gone through a number of line-up changes, with only bassist Steve Soto appearing on every Adolescents record. The band was formed in 1980 by Soto, who had been the original bass player for Agent Orange (7), when he hooked up an Agent Orange fan named Tony Brandenburg (better known by his mulitple aliases: Tony Reflex, Tony Cadena, Tony Montana (4)). Soto then approach guitarist Rikk Agnew, but Rikk recommended his younger brother, Frank, instead. The line-up was then rounded out by guitarist John O'Donovan and drummer Peter Pan (10). Rikk Agnew quickly changed his mind about playing in the band and soon O'Donovan and Pan were replaced by Rikk and his friend, Casey Royer, respectively. This line-up recorded the band's first 7", "Amoeba", in 1980 and the band's self-titled LP (often referred to as "The Blue Album") in 1981. The Blue Album would prove to be a very influential record and the band's most popular release. Rikk Agnew departed shortly afterwards. He was initially replaced by Pat Smear and then Royer's roommate Steve Roberts (4), who appeared on the band's follow-up 7", "Welcome To Reality", also released in 1981, but the band split shortly afterwards. Montana, Rikk Agnew, and Steve Soto reunited in 1986, adding drummer Sandy Hanson and guitarist Alfie Agnew (Rikk and Frank's younger brother). This line-up released "Brats In Battalions" in 1987. Alfie left after the recording and was replaced by Dan Colburn. Colburn was later replaced by Paul Casey (3). Tony left the following year and Rikk and Steve shared vocal duties for 1988's "Balboa Fun Zone". Frank Agnew returned to the fold shortly afterwards and the Blue Album line-up even reunited for some live appearances in 1989 (one of which was released as the album "Return To The Black Hole" in 1997) but the band split again the same year.

The Adolescents remained dormant throughout the 1990s but members participated in a number of different bands. In 2001, the Blue Album line-up reunited again to play shows live shows. Casey Royer and Rikk Agnew soon bowed out but the band still continues to play with several different drummers and second guitarists. They released "O.C. Confidential" in 2005 and are working on a follow-up.
Mudhoney
Mudhoney
Since the late ’80s, Mudhoney – the Seattle-based foursome whose muck-crusted version of rock, shot through with caustic wit and battened down by a ferocious low end – has been a high-pH tonic against the ludicrous and the insipid.

Thirty years later, the world is experiencing a particularly high-water moment for both those ideals. But just in time, vocalist Mark Arm, guitarist Steve Turner, bassist Guy Maddison, and drummer Dan Peters are back with Digital Garbage, a barbed-wire-trimmed collection of sonic brickbats. Arm’s raw yawp and his bandmates’ long-honed chemistry make Digital Garbage an ideal release valve for the 2018 pressure cooker, its insistent rhythms forcing movement and Arm’s sardonic lyrics offering a funhouse-mirror companion to the ever-more-ridiculous news cycle. “My sense of humor is dark, and these are dark times,” says Arm. “I suppose it’s only getting darker.”

Digital Garbage opens with the swaggering “Nerve Attack,” which can be heard as a nod both to modern-life anxiety and the ever-increasing threat of warfare. The album’s title comes from the outro of “Kill Yourself Live,” which segues from a revved-up Arm organ solo into a bleak look at the way notoriety goes viral. “I’m not on social media, so my experience is somewhat limited,” says Arm. “But people really seem to find validation in the likes—and then there’s Facebook Live, where people have streamed torture and murder, or, in the case of Philando Castile, getting murdered by a cop.”

“In the course of writing that song,” he adds, “I thought about how, once you put something out there online, you can’t wipe it away. It’s always going to be there—even if no one digs it up, it’s still out there floating somewhere.”

Appropriately enough, bits of recent news events float through the record—”Please Mr. Gunman,” on which Arm bellows “We’d rather die in church!” over his bandmates’ careening charge, was inspired by a TV-news bubblehead’s response to a 2017 church shooting, while the ominous refrain that opens the submerged-blues of “Next Mass Extinction” calls back to last summer’s clashes in Charlottesville, although Arm’s brutal delivery helps twist it into an indictment. Arm also went back to the pre-Mudhoney era for the titular insult of the stinging “Hey Neanderfuck.” ”National Lampoon made several comedy records in the 70s, and in one skit someone gets called a ‘Neanderfuck,’” Arm laughs. “I’ve always loved that insult and wondered why it never became a part of the American lexicon—it’s so brutal. It was high time to use that.”

Mudhoney’s core sound—steadily pounding drums, swamp-thing bass, squalling guitar wobble, Arm’s hazardous-chemical voice—remains on Digital Garbage, which the band recorded with longtime collaborator (and Digital Garbage pianist) Johnny Sangster at the Seattle studio Litho. The anti-religiosity shimmy “21st Century Pharisees” builds its case with Maddison’s woozy synths. “It adds a really nice touch to the proceedings,” Arm says of Maddison’s synth parts. “And Guy has really learned his way around his machines playing in a synth trio the past few years.”

The shuffling “Messiah’s Lament” is the band’s first song in 6/8—and it’s told from the point of view of a world-weary Jesus. And Digital Garbage closes with “Oh Yeah,” a brief celebration of skateboarding, surfing, biking, and the joy provided by these escape valves. “I would’ve really just loved to write songs about just hanging out on the beach, and going on a nice vacation,” says Arm. “But, you know, that probably doesn’t make for great rock.”

Mudhoney, however, know what does make great rock—and the riffs and fury of Digital Garbage will stand the test of time, even if the particulars fade away. “I’ve tried to keep things somewhat universal, so that this album doesn’t just seem like of this time—hopefully some of this stuff will go away,” Arm laughs. “You don’t want to say in the future, ‘Hey, those lyrics are still relevant. Great!’”
Claw Hammer
Claw Hammer
Claw Hammer was an American indie rock band from California. Claw Hammer formed in 1986 in Long Beach, California; its members were from several neighboring municipalities. Their name was taken from a Captain Beefheart song. The group released a cassette and some small-issue EPs and singles before signing to Sympathy for the Record Industry, who released their debut LP, an eponymous effort, in 1990. In 1991 they did an album entirely covering Devo's 1978 Are We Not Men? We Are Devo!. The group signed to Epitaph Records for their 1993 release, Pablum. In 1994, Claw Hammer performed as the backing band on Wayne Kramer's Epitaph release, The Hard Stuff. Jumping to major label Interscope, they released two more LPs, the last being 1997's Hold Your Tongue (and Say Apple). The group played live until 2000.

A reunion show was held on September 13, 2013 at The Echo in Echo Park, Los Angeles.

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Venue Information:
The Glass House
200 W. Second St
Pomona, CA, 91766
http://www.theglasshouse.us/